Jcpenney Saving Me Money

Dec 15

Black Blood: Ross Macdonald and the Oil Spill

lareviewofbooks:

JEFFERSON HUNTER

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Sometimes I Wonder (On Doing An Evil Deed)
© John Finneran 2009

“Three or four miles beyond the end of the pier, a half-dozen oil platforms blazed with lights like leafless Christmas trees.  And off to the north, like a menacing West Coast Statue of Liberty, a giant gas flame flared.”

The Blue Hammer (1976)

There are many reasons to read Ross Macdonald’s midcentury crime novels.  All are exceptionally well-written, acute and humane in examining the psychology of guilt, and scrupulously observant about Southern California, that land of “the short hairs and the long hairs, the potheads and the acid heads, draft dodgers and dollar chasers, swingers and walking wounded, idiot saints, hard cases, foolish virgins” (so The Instant Enemy puts it in 1968).  Still another reason to read Macdonald is his fascination with the region’s natural terrain, which over the course of his career became more and more a part of his dark stories.  From some initial criminal act, Macdonald’s plots typically spread out widely in space and time, until they cover a whole landscape with a stain of wrongdoing or betrayal, and California itself comes to seem the victim.

In The Underground Man (1971), for example, Santa Ana winds spread brush fires around a coastal city, accelerating the plot and making Macdonald’s private-eye hero Lew Archer do his investigating in the midst of threatened hillside subdivisions, with the air moving in spurts behind him like hot animal breath.  Archer passes an old avocado grove in the path of the fire and sees the hanging fruits as grenades waiting to be detonated.  The natural world, however traduced, can also be healing.  At the end of The Galton Case (1959), after a long night of recriminations ending in a suicide, we hear of dawn lightening the sky, of birds beginning to sing, of detective and suspects listening to the birdsong together.  The novel’s last line is “Even the dead man seemed to be listening.”

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Dec 15

beta.boston.com: From the Globe Lab: The Pulse →

beta-boston:

One of the definitions of the word pulse is the underlying sentiment or opinion or an indication of it. Welcome to our latest experiment in the vast world of social information called, appropriately, The Pulse.

The Globe Lab, in partnership with Mullen Communications and Pointslocal, has developed a concept designed to gather existing social data and analyze its sentiment to determine the online world’s view of a particular topic. The pilot of this project, a site just released in beta, is focused on the mood of Red Sox nation.

Dec 15
nythroughthelens:
Yellow flowers in full bloom along the High Line Park. Chelsea, New York City. I love the juxtaposition between the flowers that grow along the High Line and the distinctly urban views that exist beyond the High Line. It’s really beautiful but there is something vaguely post-apocalyptic about it. The scenery calls to mind “Life After People” or “I am Legend”.  Beyond being a great place to stir the imagination, the High Line Park is also a great spot to enjoy views of the Hudson River and lower Manhattan skylines while being surrounded by lush natural landscapes: “The park’s attractions include naturalized plantings that are inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew on the disused tracks and new, often unexpected views of the city and the Hudson River. Pebble-dash concrete walkways unify the trail, which swells and constricts, swinging from side to side, and divides into concrete tines that meld the hardscape with the planting embedded in railroad gravel mulch. Stretches of track and ties recall the High Line’s former use. Portions of track are adaptively re-used for rolling lounges positioned for river views. Most of the planting, which includes 210 species, is of rugged meadow plants, including clump-forming grasses, liatris and coneflowers, with scattered stands of sumac and smokebush, but not limited to American natives. At the Gansevoort end, a grove of mixed species of birch already provides some dappled shade by late afternoon. Ipê timber for the built-in benches has come from a managed forest certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, to ensure sustainable use, conservation of biological diversity, water resources, and fragile ecosystems.”SourceView this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page
Buy “Flowers Along the High Line” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

nythroughthelens:

Yellow flowers in full bloom along the High Line Park. Chelsea, New York City.

I love the juxtaposition between the flowers that grow along the High Line and the distinctly urban views that exist beyond the High Line. It’s really beautiful but there is something vaguely post-apocalyptic about it. The scenery calls to mind “Life After People” or “I am Legend”.

Beyond being a great place to stir the imagination, the High Line Park is also a great spot to enjoy views of the Hudson River and lower Manhattan skylines while being surrounded by lush natural landscapes:

“The park’s attractions include naturalized plantings that are inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew on the disused tracks and new, often unexpected views of the city and the Hudson River. Pebble-dash concrete walkways unify the trail, which swells and constricts, swinging from side to side, and divides into concrete tines that meld the hardscape with the planting embedded in railroad gravel mulch. Stretches of track and ties recall the High Line’s former use. Portions of track are adaptively re-used for rolling lounges positioned for river views.

Most of the planting, which includes 210 species, is of rugged meadow plants, including clump-forming grasses, liatris and coneflowers, with scattered stands of sumac and smokebush, but not limited to American natives. At the Gansevoort end, a grove of mixed species of birch already provides some dappled shade by late afternoon. Ipê timber for the built-in benches has come from a managed forest certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, to ensure sustainable use, conservation of biological diversity, water resources, and fragile ecosystems.”Source

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page



Buy “Flowers Along the High Line” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Dec 15

Micah Frank | Sound Programming: Sonification of Earthquakes off the Coast of Honshu, Japan - Friday March 11, 2011 →

micahfrank:

Earthquakes off the east coast of Honshu, Japan - Friday March 11, 2011 by Micah Frank

Sonification of the incredible seismic activity off the coast of Honshu, Japan - Friday March 11th.

This is only a selection of 20 or so individual readings. At the time of this…

Dec 15

World of E's: Badge Working Group →

worldofe:

Last week, I trekked up to NYC for a two day meeting with the badge working group. What is the BWG you might be asking - its a pretty frickin’ cool group of folks exploring badges and innovative assessments for learning.

This was actually the second meeting of the BWG which is funded by a…

Dec 15

Sacred Dirt

lareviewofbooks:

SUSAN STEWART

on Michel Serres’s ecological philosophy.

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It Runs in the Family © 2010 Joshua Dildine


Michel Serres
Malfeasance: Appropriation Through Pollution?

Stanford University Press, September 2010. 104 pp.

If only the magical etiologies of consumerism were true — oranges grow in the produce aisle, milk flows from the dairy case, shirts and shoes emerge online. However, a deeper look into the origins of these products is sure to darken your view. Take, for example, the cell phone. Its battery and other parts have likely been manufactured in the Special Economic Zone of Shenzhen, China, an area once known for its fertile, hilly farmland. The Shenzhen landscape has been bulldozed flat; the rain runs black with acid and, despite recent experiments with electric taxis, and state propaganda promising the greening of the city, it is often not safe to breathe outdoors. The air inside the enormous complexes, where cell phones, tablets, and other electronic devices are assembled for a variety of brands — including Apple, Hewlett Packard, Dell, Motorola, and Nokia — likely isn’t any safer. Migrant workers from the countryside reside in company-provided dormitories. Their performance is measured in seconds. The only way they can make a living above a subsistence level is by taking on illegal amounts of overtime. One worker perished of exhaustion after a 34-hour shift. At least 17 workers committed suicide in 2010 and 2011; one, as I write in late July, as recently as a few days ago. China’s overall suicide rate is high compared to other countries, but the factory owners’ decision to string nets around the upper stories of these industrial complexes indicates a different kind of business as usual.

Beyond this grim point of origin, your phone is likely to have a troubled afterlife. Use it in public in confined spaces and you’ll be sure to get attention from other people: you’ll be keeping them distracted when they would like to concentrate and awake when they would like to rest; your conversations at a distance will take precedence over their face-to-face conversations. Even if such “mental pollution” does not trouble you; your physical health will be answering to your phone. Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology issued a report this spring describing how cell phone signals can disorient bees and may be the primary cause of the widespread catastrophe of colony collapse that has been progressing since the 1970s. Sad for the bees, you might think, and you may even realize it has been a while since you have seen a honeybee. Some might argue that constant non-ionizing radiation next to the brain does not conclusively cause brain cancer or change brain glucose metabolism (counter to a recent announcement from the World Health Organization), but you and your fellow animals nevertheless need to eat to live: honeybees fertilize 70 percent of the 100 crops most often used for human food.

Finally, when a cell phone is traded in for a new one, consider where the plastic, lead, and lithium of the old one will go; someone is going to arrange for the outdated phone’s disposal — you may even yourself take the time to deliver it to a recycling center, but where and how will the recycling come about? If you take your old phone to a responsible organization, you could help reduce the disastrous environmental and human consequences of mining throughout the world; if you let it fall into less scrupulous hands, it may end up dumped in Nigeria or back in China.

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Dec 15

SlutWalk NYC: Kimberlynn Acevedo's Response to the Racist, Offensive Sign at SlutWalk NYC →

slutwalknyc:

This is an individual response.

One of our march’s participants last Saturday held up and promulgated a racist, offensive sign. She was asked to take it down by one of our organizers as soon as it came to our attention. This sign symbolizes many of the critiques about SlutWalk not being a safe…